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BUG: "The drive cannot find the sector requested"

Topics: Technical Issues
Dec 17, 2015 at 11:32 PM
Edited Dec 17, 2015 at 11:35 PM
When trying to Decrypt my System Drive within Windows 7 I get a message indicating a disk sector cannot be read from. The actual error is:

The drive cannot find the sector requested.
Source: VeraCrypt::BootEncryption::CallDriver:491

However, SpeedFan reports no bad sectors or sector remaps. A full Intel RST surface test reports no bad sectors or sector remaps. A full Chkdsk sector test reports no bad sectors or remaps. And finally a full MiniTool Partition Wizard surface read test reports no bad sectors or remaps. MiniTool was also able to successfully read data from every single sector on the disk surface. This means that 3 independent, industry standard surface testing tools all report my Raid 1 volume to be in perfect health. The error instantaneously appears when trying to do the Decryption process. This means that not even the first sector is decrypted before the error is thrown. I am running the "Nightly Build" of VeraCrypt 1.17-BETA November 25th.

Can anyone check to see if the recent Boot Loader changes may have upset another part of VC so that it now thinks it's own Boot Loader is corrupted or incorrect?

PS: Thanks for all of your work on VC, I definitely appreciate it a lot. I was a huge fan of TC!
Dec 27, 2015 at 7:34 PM
Edited Jan 11, 2016 at 12:09 AM
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Dec 29, 2015 at 6:45 PM
I cannot tell about system partition, but decryption of non-system partition (encrypted by TC) worked for me with vc 1.17. But it can be a bug. Can you repeat this on different system? What are the exact steps to repeat? 1. encrypt system with VC (or TC?), 2. try to decrypt with VC and error appears? Normally I don't encrypt system, just data, but I'm going to reinstall my windows, so I can test it.

If the standard procedure does not work for you, maybe the only solution is probably to transfer your data elsewhere and reinstall os.
Coordinator
Dec 29, 2015 at 8:09 PM
Hi,

First of all, the error you are receiving (ERROR_SECTOR_NOT_FOUND) is not thrown by VeraCrypt itself but rather it is returned by Windows when we try to read data from disk and VeraCrypt forward it to the GUI.

I can't reproduce the error on a Windows 7 64-bit that is using a normal disk (not RAID) (tested AES and Serpent). Unfortunately, I don't have a RAID to test but I don't see why it would cause a problem to decryption of the system.

Concerning the tools you used to check the sectors of your RAID, did you run them from withing the encrypted system or did you connect your RAID to another machine?

A good test to do at this stage is to start the decryption using the Rescue Disk: boot on it and start the decryption to see if you have any errors or not. The advantage of the Rescue Disk is that it talks directly to the disk using BIOS primitives so there are no driver side effects. If the Rescue Disk doesn't encounter any error, you can pause the decryption and then try to resume it from Windows.

Does this approach help? Does the Rescue Disk also report an error when reading from disk?

Thank you in advance for your feedback. This is a strange issue and we'll try to find an explanation.
Jan 11, 2016 at 12:16 AM
idrassi wrote:
Hi,

First of all, the error you are receiving (ERROR_SECTOR_NOT_FOUND) is not thrown by VeraCrypt itself but rather it is returned by Windows when we try to read data from disk and VeraCrypt forward it to the GUI.

I can't reproduce the error on a Windows 7 64-bit that is using a normal disk (not RAID) (tested AES and Serpent). Unfortunately, I don't have a RAID to test but I don't see why it would cause a problem to decryption of the system.

Concerning the tools you used to check the sectors of your RAID, did you run them from withing the encrypted system or did you connect your RAID to another machine?

A good test to do at this stage is to start the decryption using the Rescue Disk: boot on it and start the decryption to see if you have any errors or not. The advantage of the Rescue Disk is that it talks directly to the disk using BIOS primitives so there are no driver side effects. If the Rescue Disk doesn't encounter any error, you can pause the decryption and then try to resume it from Windows.

Does this approach help? Does the Rescue Disk also report an error when reading from disk?

Thank you in advance for your feedback. This is a strange issue and we'll try to find an explanation.
Hello! Sorry for the late reply but the holidays had me busy!

A bit of background on what I think may have happened: I was using 2 algorithms in cascade, which I believe means the bootloader needs to be larger than normal. This may be problem #1. Then I went ahead, like an idiot, and updated my Intel RST Windows program which also includes new low-level RAID drivers. The update went fine, but upon rebooting my computer Windows would not load anything from disk (the HDD light on my case would not blink or turn on at all) and it would then BSOD after 60 seconds. I tried Safe Mode and got the same result (BSOD). I used System Restore to "Restore the last successful boot" and was able to recover Windows so it would boot. Of course, this also meant I was back using the old Intel RST package and low-level drivers. It was after this mess that I tried to decrypt my system drive and got the aforementioned problem (disk sector errors).

So today I went into my RAID BIOS and broke up my RAID 1. This leaves me with 2 HDD's with identical contents. I can boot either one of them into Windows just fine (I have broken up RAID 1 volumes many times before). I removed one from my computer, and booted into Windows with just 1 disk. I am now able to decrypt my System Drive without getting the sector errors I was getting before.

So I think some advice could be given to VeraCrypt users who use System Encryption: Do not update your HDD/RAID drivers unless absolutely needed. And it may be best to decrypt first before doing so.
Jan 11, 2016 at 3:32 PM
Luckily you were using RAID 1 and not any other RAID mode.....
Jan 12, 2016 at 9:00 AM
RandomNameforCode wrote:
Luckily you were using RAID 1 and not any other RAID mode.....
Luck had nothing to do with it! There will never be a time in my life I do not use RAID 1 or 5! I have the worst of luck with HDD's and I like how I can pull out a dead one and replace it with a new one within Windows and not even have to reboot the computer!

It's also helpful for reinstalling Windows or reverting to a previous state of the computer, since all drives are perfect copies of each other, I can pull one out and put it in a safe space, and then mess around with my computer, or re-install Windows. Then I plug it back in and use it to restore all of my files etc. :D