Hacking VeraCrypt

Topics: Technical Issues, Users Discussion
Jul 27, 2015 at 11:20 PM
Edited Jul 27, 2015 at 11:27 PM
Hi I watched a film called “The imitation game” and on this basis that they knew that “Hail Hitler” was included in the broadcast update cipher they were able to break enigma.

I was looking at asking two questions.
  1. If somebody knew windows 7 was installed on a computer and was encrypted with veracrypt. Would somebody be able to use the default fixed locations of the Windows 7 files like the main OS files and be able to decrypt the cipher on that basis quicker?
  2. If you know the password contains certain letters or numbers would it make it much easier to break if for example the password id 173tgdguIo@937! how substantial would this be and how much easier would it be to break the password? For Example I know the password contains number 1,7,3,@ (but not the order of them or how big the password is?
Jul 29, 2015 at 7:34 PM
1) Having known plaintext is always helpful to the attacker. However, VeraCrypt's encryption technology is to the Enigma as the Star Trek warp drive is to a bicycle, and the usefulness of having plaintext is far greater for Enigma-type encryption than it is for VeraCrypt-type encryption. If you're really concerned, make use of the triple cascading encryption that VeraCrypt provides, along with a very long and diversely charactered passphrase and perhaps a keyfile on top of that.

2) This has the de facto effect of shortening your passphrase. If your passphrase is 15 characters of which 4 are known, then in effect you have only an 11 character passphrase. Nobody should have a passphrase anywhere near that short! I would suggest using 35 to 60 diverse characters instead.
Aug 4, 2015 at 6:48 PM
commenter8 wrote:
1) Having known plaintext is always helpful to the attacker. However, VeraCrypt's encryption technology is to the Enigma as the Star Trek warp drive is to a bicycle, and the usefulness of having plaintext is far greater for Enigma-type encryption than it is for VeraCrypt-type encryption. If you're really concerned, make use of the triple cascading encryption that VeraCrypt provides, along with a very long and diversely charactered passphrase and perhaps a keyfile on top of that.
It is not so simple (luckily) :) As the OP is obviously talking about full disk encryption, even if one knows pretty much about each and every single file included with Windows 7...... then it is still of almost NO use for him as he wouldn't know where these files are on the disk (sectors), these files will be fragmented too (most probably) so this is not really what is called "known plain text attack". Still, in EXTREME THEORY, this weakness could EVENTUALLY weaken the encryption, although i dont think such an attack is feasible at all. Well... imagine a brand new Windows 7 installation..... encrypted with VC.... well, then we basically have an issue..... hmmm... and if an attacker has access to multiple versions of the volume.... (good OP!!!! interesting)
2) This has the de facto effect of shortening your passphrase. If your passphrase is 15 characters of which 4 are known, then in effect you have only an 11 character passphrase. Nobody should have a passphrase anywhere near that short! I would suggest using 35 to 60 diverse characters instead.
I think you guys are becoming paranoid, least to say. A password 35 to 60 characters long???? LOL .... some more effort for your password length and you can use one time pad instead of all these insecure ciphers :) LOL