Windows 10

Topics: Users Discussion
Nov 21, 2014 at 2:42 PM
Being a long time TrueCrypt user, I was delighted to discover VeraCrypt via a recent article in Windows Secrets newsletter. However the author of the article mentioned that VeraCrypt is incompatible with Windows 8.x, and he suggested the same would be so for the upcoming Windows 10. Documentation here seems to say otherwise since Windows 8 and 8.1 are specifically listed under "Supported Systems". I must have misunderstood something. Can someone explain whether VeraCrypt will work under the newest Windows OSes in the ways I am used to (namely, I use TrueCrypt to create a single file storage container saved on thumb drives as well as within a folder on my HDD). No doubt this has been asked and answered previously -- if so, sorry, but I could not find it here.....
Coordinator
Nov 21, 2014 at 3:07 PM
Yes, VeraCrypt is compatible with Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. The only limitation is with respect to full system encryption with UEFI or GPT partition which has not been implemented yet. If you install Windows 8.x on a MBR partition on BIOS mode, you can perform full system encryption.

In the use case you are describing, VeraCrypt will perfectly work under Windows 8.x and also on Windows 10 although the later is available only as preview and things may change in the future.

Anyway, I think the author of the article you mentioned should have clarified more his statements with regards to VeraCrypt compatibilities.
Nov 21, 2014 at 7:54 PM
Thanks for the rapid reply. This is great news! Now it's time to get started and convert everything I have to VeraCrypt. Since I know how to use TrueCrypt to create a container file, format it, etc., I assume learning to do this using VeraCrypt will be straightforward. Hope so.

Having TrueCrypt become orphaned was quite a loss -- thanks to all those who have contributed to this effort!

John
Dec 11, 2014 at 12:49 PM
Well, they did it again. Below is an excerpt from the latest newsletter:
"But please explain why a VeraCrypt-encrypted container (not whole-drive encryption) is incompatible with the future direction of Windows."
The short answer is that VeraCrypt (and, so far, all similar products) causes part of the Win8 backup and recovery system to fail. <<
They say a lot more -- again, here's another excerpt:
If you use products — such as TrueCrypt, VeraCrypt, or BoxCryptor — that create "containers" with assigned drive letters, you then won't be able to make or restore Win8 custom-recovery images by normal methods. The process simply fails. <<
Since they are evidently NOT talking about encrypting whole drives or partitions, this really bothers me. My plan was to continue using VeraCrypt just as I had been doing with TrueCrypt, that is, to have an encrypted single file container which I then store on either the HDD someplace or on flash drives. My default mode is to leave this container closed most of the time, and to only open it for short term access to files (just like a bank safety deposit box). Has something changed so that I will no longer be able to do this using VeraCrypt under Win 8.x - Win 10? Has the newsletter got it wrong again?
Coordinator
Dec 11, 2014 at 6:33 PM
I don't know who writes this newsletter but their statement is wrong and completely misleading. Either the people behind it are incompetent, or they failed to clarify their statement by "mistake" or they have an agenda behind this.

One thing is for sure: if all VeraCrypt volumes are dismounted during the creation of a recovery image, there will be no issues simply because Windows doesn't know about them!!

If they are really honest, they should tell people to dismount all encrypted volumes before creating a recovery image in order to avoid any potential issues. Instead, they tell people to not use any encryption at all (apart from Bitlocker I suppose).

And last point: when you are using encrypted volume to store sensitive data, the last thing you want is create a Windows recovery image the contains these data. Thus the intuitive dismouting of all volumes before creating any system image.

A message to the editors of this newsletter: please feel free to clarify the issues you are talking about and explain why I'm wrong in thinking that your statements are false and at minimum misleading.
Dec 11, 2014 at 7:38 PM
idrassi wrote:
or they have an agenda behind this.
This is something I am noticing, I remember tackling at least one member of this forum who was attempting this sort of thing.

Actually this is good news, if they are trying to discredit VeraCrypt then they are clearly frightened of it :)

Well done Mounir, VeraCrypt is so good they are worried :D
Dec 11, 2014 at 7:49 PM
Thanks for (again) explaining things so well. I wonder, would it be reasonable to send them your exact words, of course without the part re an agenda <g>? If not, I can of course rephrase it. Regardless, they need to be alerted about their error-laden statements in a direct way....!
Dec 11, 2014 at 8:16 PM
I would suggest to them, if they wish to write about VeraCrypt they should post a draft here and allow Mounir to correct it before they publish.
Dec 11, 2014 at 8:39 PM
Edited Dec 11, 2014 at 8:42 PM
That might be good idea too. However first I intend to alert them to what's going on and I cannot think of a better explanation then some of the words spoken by idrassi. Maybe just this main portion:

"One thing is for sure: if all VeraCrypt volumes are dismounted during the creation of a recovery image, there will be no issues simply because Windows doesn't know about them!!

If they are really honest, they should tell people to dismount all encrypted volumes before creating a recovery image in order to avoid any potential issues. Instead, they tell people to not use any encryption at all (apart from Bitlocker I suppose).

And last point: when you are using encrypted volume to store sensitive data, the last thing you want is create a Windows recovery image the contains these data. Thus the intuitive dismouting of all volumes before creating any system image.

A message to the editors of this newsletter: please feel free to clarify the issues you are talking about and explain why I'm wrong in thinking that your statements are false and at minimum misleading."
Coordinator
Dec 12, 2014 at 8:49 PM
Please feel free to use any part of my answer to alert them of their mistake.